VISION DEVELOPMENT OF THE PRESCHOOL CHILD


3 – 6 years
During the preschool years, the child develops eye-hand-body coordination, fine-motor skills, and the visual motor skills needed to learn to read.

Basic vision skills needed for school


To be successful in school, children need certain basic visual skills. These include:
• Near vision - the ability to see clearly and comfortably at ten to thirteen inches.
• Distance vision - the ability to see clearly and comfortably beyond an arm's length.
• Binocular coordination - the ability to use both eyes together in a coordinated manner.
• Eye movement skills - the ability to aim the eyes accurately, move them smoothly across a page, and shift them quickly and accurately from one object to another.
• Focusing skills - the ability to keep both eyes accurately focused at the proper distance to see clearly and change focus quickly.
• Peripheral awareness - awareness of things located to the side while looking straight ahead.
• Eye/hand coordination - the ability to use the eyes and hands together.

Symptoms indicating vision problems


When eye problems are present, children generally exhibit one or more symptoms to indicate they are having difficulty seeing things clearly. If one or more of the following symptoms is present, or persists for more than a few days, the child should see an eye professional.
• Excessive rubbing of the eyes.
• Constantly closing one eye.
• Tearing or unusual light sensitivity.
• Red, itchy or swollen eyes.
• Inability to see things others can see.
• Eyestrain when reading.
• Complains of headaches.
• Wandering or crossed eyes.
• Turns or tilts head to use one eye only.
• Loses their place while reading.
• Uses a finger to keep place while reading.
• Avoids close work.
• Holds reading materials closer than normal.
• Makes frequent reversals when reading or writing.
• Omits or confuses small words when reading.
Activities to encourage vision development
Reading aloud to the child and letting him see what you are reading encourages vision development. Other activities that encourage the development of vision include providing the child with chalkboard, finger paints, and different shaped blocks and showing him or her how to use them in imaginative play. Children should also be provided with safe opportunities to use playground equipment such as a jungle gym and balance beam, and should be allowed time to interact with other children as well as to play independently

Toys to develop a good vision

• building toys with large snap-together pieces
• stringing beads
• puzzles
• pegboard
• crayons
• finger paints
• chalk
• large balls
• modeling clay
• simple sewing cards
• tricycle
• follow-the-dot games
• sticker books
• games

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TEST 2


Let's name colors that were used to write this text!
MAKE IT IN 15 SECONDS!

YELLOW BLUE ORANGE
BLACK RED GREEN
VIOLET YELLOW RED
ORANGE GREEN BLACK
BLUE VIOLET RED
GREEN BLUE ORANGE


If you did it quickly, conflict happened between brain hemispheres!
RIGHT hemisphere of brain- tries to name colors, however
LEFT hemisphere of brain- analyses the meaning of words


Let's be creative!

Sir Ken Robinson "Do schools kill creativity?

Part 1.


Part 2.


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